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Feature

Dress code skirted in classrooms

Jessie Kong | Staff Editor

Clothes aren’t the only thing that might need to be patched up. In classrooms, students are rarely called out if they violate the dress code.

MMS has a myriad of rules set to sustain discipline and safety, the dress code being most popularly discussed among students. Chock-full of limits ranging from no spaghetti straps to hemlines lower than or equal to three inches above the knee, personal viewpoints spread across the school every day. Assistant principal Lauren Gentene said that the dress code’s purpose is to keep kids focused during class.

“The dress code serves to…eliminate distraction from our educational environment as well as protect the dignity of each student,” Gentene said.

Seventh grade gym teacher Kyle Peters said if a student doesn’t follow regulations, there will be a conversation.

“If a student violates the dress code…I have a conversation with them and if they’re able to fix that dress code situation, I have them do that,” Peters said. “If not, I remind them next time that they need to not wear that type of clothing or that item.”

Seventh grader Ishika Paul, however, said she questions the dress code’s level of enforcement

“I’ve never actually seen a teacher tell somebody off for wearing something inappropriate,” Paul said.

Assistant principal Lauren Gentene said that this may be true because classroom teachers can’t always see everything that students are wearing.

“If a teacher’s standing out in the hallway and greeting students as they arrive…they are seeing your full body as you walk in as opposed to just seeing you for the first time when you are seated at your desk,” Gentene said.

Peters, however, is able to see the entirety of students’ attire with his position teaching gym and has caught a student for wearing inappropriate clothing.

But, according to Gentene, this may ultimately be okay. The dress code might not be effective to all, but it is on others and will continue to serve as guidelines.

“It’s kind-of like driving down the highway,” she said. “Your parents are speeding, and there’s probably lots of cars speeding, and not every car gets pulled over, but sometimes a car gets pulled over. We maybe are not able to enforce everything all the time, but that’s kind-of how life is.”

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